RESEARCH ARTICLE


Odontogenic Keratocyst in Children: A Review



Ahmed H. Kamil1, Bassel Tarakji2, *
1 Department of Oral Maxillofacial Sciences, Alfarabi College of Dentistry and Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, Alfarabi College of Dentistry and Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia


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© Tarakji and Kamil; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International Public License (CC BY-NC 4.0) (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/legalcode), which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Oral Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, Alfarabi College of Dentistry and Nursing, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; Tel: 00966504623330; E-mail: denpol@yahoo.co.uk


Abstract

Objective:

Is to highlight the characteristics and management of odontogenic keratocyst in children only

Material and Method:

Computerized search in pubmed between (2005-2015) using specific words such as odontogenic keratocyst in children, odontogenic keratocyst association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with abstract written in English only.

Result:

During computerized literature search 77 articles in the years (2005-2015) were found. All these publications were miscellaneous studies including case series and case reports. Only 35 papers were selected which conform to our criteria. Most of the papers indicate that the histological type of keratocyst prevalent in children was parakeratinized variant, and most of the cases occurred in maxilla rather than mandible.

Conclusion:

We recommend that the surgeons who treat keratocysts in children take into consideration the late presentation in addition to the destructive nature and high recurrence rate. General practitioners face difficulty in early detection and referral of children with keratocysts or Gorlin syndrome. Treatment by multidiscplinary team is important if associated with Gorlin's syndrome Postoperative follow up is advised every 6 months.

Keywords: Dental lamina, Odontogenic keratocyst in children, Odontogenic keratocyst in children and association with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, Odontogenic tumors.