RESEARCH ARTICLE


Lactate Dehydrogenase Activity in Gingival Crevicular Fluid as a Marker in Orthodontic Tooth Movement



Sarah A Alfaqeeha, Sukumaran Anilb, *
a Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Post Box: 60169, Riyadh11545, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
b Dental Implant and Osseointegration Research Chair, Department of Periodontics and Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Post Box: 60169, Riyadh11545, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia


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Creative Commons License
© Alfaqeeh and Anil; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the Department of Periodontics and Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Post Box: 60169, Riyadh11545, Saudi Arabia; Tel: +96614677434; Mobile: +966500197223; Fax: 0096614679017; E-mail: drsanil@gmail.com


Abstract

Objectives:

This study aims at analyzing the changes in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity during orthodontic movement.

Methods:

Twenty patients all requiring first premolar extractions were selected and treated with conventional straight wire mechanotherapy. Canine retraction was done using 125 g Nitinol closed coil springs. The maxillary canine on one side served as the experimental site while the contralateral canine served as the control. GCF was collected from the canines before initiation of retraction, then 1 hour after initiating canine retraction, followed by 1 day, 7 days, 14 days and 21 days. GCF LDH levels were estimated and compared with the control site.

Results

The results revealed significantly higher LDH levels on the 7th, 14th and 21st day at the sites where orthodontic force had been applied. The levels also showed a significant increase from 0 hour to the 21st day. Peak levels were seen on 14th and 21st day following initiation of retraction.

Conclusions:

The study showed that LDH could be successfully estimated in the GCF and its increased levels could indicate active tooth movement, which could aid the clinician in monitoring active orthodontic tooth movement.

Keywords: Lactate dehydrogenase, diagnostic indicator, gingival crevicular fluid, orthodontic tooth movement, canine retraction.