RESEARCH ARTICLE


Full Mouth Rehabilitation with Implant-Supported Prostheses for Severe Periodontitis: A Case Report



Sompop Bencharit1, *, Debra Schardt-Sacco 2, Michael B Border3, Colin P Barbaro4
1 Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry; and Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
2 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; and Private Practice, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
3 Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina. Chapel Hill, NC, USA; and University of Mount Union, Alliance, OH, USA
4 Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA


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Creative Commons License
© Bencharit et al.; Licensee Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article licensed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted, non-commercial use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the work is properly cited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the CB #7450, Department of Prosthodontics, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7450, USA; Tel: 919-843-8734; Fax: 919-966-3821; E-mail: Sompop_Bencharit@dentistry.unc.edu


Abstract

Oral rehabilitation for a patient with severe loss of alveolar bone and soft tissue resulting from severe periodontitis presents a challenge to clinicians. Replacing loosening natural teeth with fixed prostheses supported by dental implants often requires either gingival surgery or bone grafting. The outcome of the bone grafting is sometimes unpredictable and requires longer healing time and/ or multiple surgeries. The presence of periodontal inflammation and periapical lesions often delay the placement of bone grafts as well as dental implants. Here we present a clinical case of a patient undergone full mouth reconstruction with implant-supported fixed prostheses. We demonstrated that early placement of implants (three weeks after extractions) with minimal bone grafting may be an alternative to conventional bone grafting followed by implant placement. We believe that primary stability during implant placement may contribute to our success. In addition, composite resin gingival material may be indicated in cases of large fixed implant prostheses as an alternative to pink porcelain.

Keywords: Dental implants, Full mouth rehabiliation, Full mouth reconstruction, Periodontitis, Early implant placement.